Best answer: What happens to moist air when it is forced to rise by a mountain?

What happens to moist air as it is forced up and over a mountain?

As air rises, it expands because there is less atmospheric pressure at higher altitudes. Dense masses of warm, moist air that move up and over a mountain swell as the air pressure confining them drops away. … This means that the total amount of water vapor the atmosphere can potentially hold is decreased.

What happens to warm moist air as it moves up a mountain Why think about change in density temperature and rainfall?

As warm, moist air rises up the side of the mountain – known as the windward side – it expands (because there’s less pressure) and it therefore cools. … It’s also why the windward side is rainy and the leeward side is dry.

What eventually happens to moist air if it rises high enough?

What eventually happens to moist air if it rises high enough? The moist air will eventually become tiny droplets or ice crystals, forming a cloud. … As it gets higher in the atmosphere, it cools causing it to not be able to hold as much moisture as before.

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Why does air lose water as it passes over the mountain?

As a cloud goes over a mountain, it rises. As air rises, it expands because there is less atmospheric pressure at higher altitudes. As air expands, it cools. Cool air holds less mois- ture, rain falls and the cloud loses moisture.

What happens when air rises?

Hot air rises. As air rises, air pressure at the surface is lowered. Rising air expands and cools (adiabatic cooling: that is, it cools due to change in volume as opposed to adding or taking away of heat). The result is condensation/precipitation.

What happens when air rises over a mountain?

As air rises over a mountain it cools and loses moisture, then warms by compression on the leeward side. The resulting warm and dry winds are Chinook winds. The leeward side of the mountain experiences rainshadow effect.

Does warm humid air rise?

Well, according to Isaac Newton, in his book Opticks, (and USA Today) humid air is actually LESS dense than dry air. … So, in a home, humid air rises upwards, not downwards. Problem 2: If humid air WAS denser than dry air, basement vents still wouldn’t work.

What happens to warm air when it cools?

As the molecules heat and move faster, they are moving apart. So air, like most other substances, expands when heated and contracts when cooled. Because there is more space between the molecules, the air is less dense than the surrounding matter and the hot air floats upward.